Post tagged "new-york-university"


Dec 11, 2017

Made in Italy and NYU Stern: James & Salvatore Ferragamo

Made in Italy and NYU Stern: James & Salvatore Ferragamo

When it comes to Italian high-fashion, names like Gucci, Versace, and Prada often come to mind. These companies, known for their quality products and timeless brands, are staples in both the fashion and business communities. Salvatore Ferragamo S.p.A., another Italian fashion company, is notable for not only their quality leather and fine wine, but also for their leadership, namely twin brothers and NYU Stern School of Business MBA graduates James and Salvatore Ferragamo.

All in the Family

James and Salvatore followed the footsteps of their father and company CEO Ferruccio, and grandfather Salvatore, who founded the brand in 1928. The company’s current structure features each of the founder’s six sons and daughters with a role on the board of directors, with other relatives also taking jobs within the organization.

However, the Ferragamo clan decided that only three members from the family’s third generation should be involved in the family business. These three members were required to have a university degree, an MBA, three years of working experience outside of Ferragamo, and English and IT skills. James and Salvatore accepted this challenge: Both graduated from NYU’s Stern School of Business with a BS in 1993 and again with an MBA in 1997.

What have the two Ferragamo heirs and Stern MBA alumni been up to lately? Both have been utilizing their strengths to push the Ferragamo brand to new heights in different ways.

Expanding “Made in Italy”

James is currently the Director of Women’s and Men’s Shoes and Leather Goods for the Salvatore Ferragamo Group. His responsibilities include overseeing all categories from bags to belts, with a focus on shoes. He briefly worked at Goldman Sachs before completing his MBA in 1997 and joining the family business. James was the first member of the third-generation Ferragamo’s to enter the business.

According to James, a big part of innovation is collaboration. Since 2010, all leather goods collections have been created side by side with the brand’s creative director, Massimiliano Giornetti. Together, James and Massimiliano have pushed Ferragamo into modern territory, while still respecting the brand’s heritage.


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“Together, we need to communicate Ferragamo’s creativity,” James told the South China Morning Post. “For Massimiliano, he pushes on the accelerator of creativity and creates novelty with the ready-to-wear. My role is to try and make sure that we have quality and never compromise on it.”

Ferragamo has always prided itself on being “Made in Italy” and James says that will remain the brand’s headlining message, even as it expands into new markets like China. “No matter what, all our products will always be made in Italy,” he said, doubling down on his decision to keep all production inside of Italy in the near future. “My father had a very rigid point of view on this. Italy, to us, represents a certain uniqueness, and people love this idea of artisanship.”

Resurrecting Il Borro

Instead of following the career trajectory of the rest of his family, Salvatore followed his true passion: wine.

“[My brother James] likes fashion, and I like wine, so it worked out perfectly,” Salvatore told The Drinks Business.

Since graduating from Stern’s MBA program in 1997, Salvatore has been tasked with expanding Ferragamo’s brand portfolio into wine and agro-tourism at Il Borro villa. The Ferragamo family purchased the Tuscan vineyard in 1993 and Salvatore has led efforts to restore the estate and innovate the wine production business, while always sticking to the family’s commitment to being “Made in Italy.”

“Fashion and wine are both a question of lifestyle, personal taste, and sensibility,” Salvatore told Wine Enthusiast. “When I was growing up, I was surrounded by a spirit of fine craftsmanship and careful attention to details that are the hallmarks of ‘Made in Italy.’ My family has always believed that this approach is the best way to express creativity, tradition and quality, and it’s true in both fashion and wine. For example, all of the grapes that go into our wines are carefully chosen by passionate hands that give each bottle its own character.”

In September, Salvatore revealed that Il Borro is producing an amphorae wine made with Sangiovese with the skins kept in contact with the clay vessel for one year. The clay is sourced locally and is made by a local amphorae maker. The wine “Unlike French oak, amphorae doesn’t give the wine notes of tobacco or spices, it focuses more on the fruit notes of the wine,” he said. Salvatore added that he is also experimenting with “a secret project” — a Chardonnay made with the same method.

Reflecting on NYU Stern

In 2006, James and Salvatore invited a group of Stern alumni to their flagship Fifth Avenue store. At the event, the Ferragamo twins were asked how studying at NYU Stern and working in New York helped them as they entered the business world.

“NYU helped me to balance my professional experience with my academic experience,” James said. “Living and working in New York City provided the opportunity to understand the practical application of what I learned, as both a graduate and an undergraduate, whether it was about finance, fashion, marketing, or advertising.”

“Studying in New York gives you the unique opportunity to learn in the business capital of the world and to be in contact with people from different countries, cultures, and businesses,” Salvatore said. “This is very important as I am promoting Il Borro estate worldwide, and it is crucial to understand, recognize, and respect different cultures when entering into any type of global business relationship.”

Fashion and Future at Stern

Recently, alongside the new Tech MBA, the Stern School of Business introduced the forward-thinking Fashion & Luxury MBA, which features several high-profile figures on its advisory board from the likes of Dolce & Gabanna, Tiffany & Co., Nike, Vogue and more.

For more information on the NYU Fashion & Luxury MBA, click here.


Dec 4, 2017

Supply Chain Management MBAs: The Best New York Programs

Supply Chain Management MBAs: The Best New York Programs

Product outsourcing is a hot topic today. Consequently, the supply chain management field is richer, more complex, and more necessary than ever. Optimizing the process of turning a concept into a product and getting that product to the shelf is integral to the success any retailer. No matter where a product is made, the progression from conception to end user is a collaborative effort. An MBA in supply chain management can help you learn who to contact and how to strategize in order to best serve both retailers and consumers.

New York City is among the retail capitals of the world. Schools in the New York metro have easy access to hundreds of CEO speakers, as well as a deluge of internship and job opportunities. Below, we’ve outlined some of our favorites.

The Best NYC Supply Chain Management MBA Programs

Columbia Business School

Though Columbia Business School does not offer concentrations, it would be remiss not to mention this academic powerhouse when considering programs with resources in supply chain management education. Columbia’s supply chain management courses are taught by extraordinarily well-regarded professors, who may serve as resources for students throughout their time at the school. Medini R. Singh, for example, is a sought-after professor. In addition to his 25+ years of teaching experience and numerous teaching awards, Singh serves on the advisory board for the W. Edwards Deming Center for Quality, Productivity, and Competitiveness. According to his bio, Singh’s research focuses on “service and supply chain design, at both the tactical and strategic level.” Singh has also consulted for multiple Fortune 500 companies. Columbia students MBAs will also have access to Awi Federgruen, the Charles E. Exley Professor of Management and Chair of the Decision, Risk and Operations Division of Columbia Business School. Federgruen has published over 120 pieces on the financial services industry, and often consults on supply chain management issues for large corporations.

Rutgers Business School, Newark and New Brunswick

Rutgers Business School offers a Supply Chain Management MBA, the mission of which, according to the website, is to “prepare students to meet and exceed the expectations of the employees experiencing a growing demand for supply chain management and logistics experts.” In fact, the school’s Supply Chain Management program was ranked eleventh on U.S. News & World Report’s 2016 list of best graduate schools for business. This ranking seems apt, considering a whopping 100 percent of the supply chain management MBA students from the class of 2016 were employed within 90 days of graduation. Students of this program have gone on to work various supply chain management jobs at companies like Este Lauder, Colgate, and Johnson & Johnson.


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Stern School of Business—New York University

The renowned New York University Stern School of Business provides students with the option of choosing a Supply Chain Management and Global Sourcing Concentration to equip MBAs to navigate supply chain issues in a global economy. Students who pursue this concentration can take classes like Global Sourcing and Open Innovation, Pricing Strategies, and Building and Managing Customer Relationships. Stern gears the specialization toward students aiming to pursue careers in management consulting, managing information systems, product management, and supply chain management. Students in this program can choose two of three core supply chain management courses, and then must take six of the 24 related elective courses.

Gabelli School of Business—Fordham University

The Gabelli School of Business at Fordham University offers many classes that specialize in supply chain management, including Operations Management. Under chair Sarah Jinhui Wu, the Gabelli Operations Management courses “equip students with a solid understanding of core operations concepts and decisions, rigorous analytical thinking and skills, and a creative mindset so they can deal with all of the complex issues of a supply chain.”

Many of the other concentrations offered in the Gabelli School of Business MBA program also offer courses revolving around supply chain management, including Global Sustainability.


Nov 29, 2017

Inside the University of Toronto’s Creative Destruction Lab

Inside the University of Toronto’s Creative Destruction Lab

The Creative Destruction Lab (CDL) at the University of Toronto Rotman School of Business is a seed-stage program created exclusively for scalable science-based companies. Launched in 2012, this program employs objectives-based mentoring to help maximize equity value creation for its ventures. The lab is best suited for early-stage companies, particularly those with links to university research labs.

The Creative Destruction Lab Program

The CDL is a nine-month program that employs a coaching process to help business founders commercialize their advances in science and technology. There are four main elements of the program:

  • Mentorship: The founders work alongside select entrepreneurs and angel investors in intensive full-day sessions to assess their business progress and to set short-term objectives.
  • Investment Opportunities: Founders have the chance to raise capital in meetings with entrepreneurs, angel investors, and partners from leading venture capital firms.
  • Technical Feedback: The founders receive advice on their technical road maps and objectives from world-renowned experts at leading academic institutions.
  • Business Development Support: Finally, the founders are able to work with MBA students to develop their financial models, evaluate potential markets, and fine-tune their strategies for scaling.

“The breadth and depth of insight that we were given access to was phenomenal,” said participant Karl Martin, founder of Nymi, a wearable technology firm in the healthcare space.

CDL Locations

Unlike many seed-stage programs, CDL has centers in five locations across Canada. Each location focuses on a specific stream of ventures and offers specific resources.

  • Calgary: Working with the Haskayne School of Business, the Calgary location focuses on a few key research pillars including energy innovations, human dynamics, engineering solutions for health, new earth-space technologies, and other areas.
  • Halifax: The Halifax location leverages the Rowe School of Business at Dalhousie University and fosters “blue-green” technology—focused on agri-tech, bioproducts, and environmental technology—and “prime” technology, including startups tackling problems in healthcare, finance, energy, chemical, media, transportation, and agriculture.
  • Montreal: In partnership with HEC Montréal, the Montreal location focuses on startups using artificial intelligence and data analysis technologies.
  • Toronto: The main location in Toronto, run alongside the Rotman School of Management, focuses on three types of startups. The first is “Prime” startups tackling problems in healthcare, finance, energy, chemical, media, transportation, and agriculture. Meanwhile, Quantum Machine Learning startups are grounded in physics, math, statistics, machine learning, electrical engineering, and/or quantum computing. Finally, massively scalable Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning startups focus exclusively on artificial intelligence and machine learning.
  • VancouverLocated in Vancouver, this location operates in partnership with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia. It focuses on startups in the “Prime” stream as well as those in BioMedTech, including chemical, biological, and medical ventures.

Partnership with NYU Stern to Expand CDL to New York

And, beginning on September 1, 2018, the Creative Destructive Lab will partner with the NYU Stern School of Business to establish its first lab outside of Canada. The newest location will bring Stern faculty and MBA students alongside angel investors, serial entrepreneurs, and founders of pre-seed stage startups in science and technology. CDL New York will begin accepting applications in January 2018 and expects to admit around 25 ventures the first year.

“Our model for developing massively scalable science-based ventures has proved successful in Canada. And we anticipate it will be similarly successful for our partners at NYU,” said Ajay Agrawal, a Rotman entrepreneurship professor and the founder and academic director of the lab, in a recent news release about the expansion.

New Program Executive Director

In other news, Rotman chose Sonia Sennik to be the inaugural executive director of the Creative Destruction Lab and its national network of programs. Sennik will be responsible for the lab’s oversight and coordination as well as its strategic operational and programmatic leadership.

As a recent graduate of Rotman’s Executive MBA program, Sennik is uniquely positioned for her new role. She was the inaugural recipient of the Rotman Social Impact Award and excelled in leadership during her time in the program. She’s also held senior project and engineering management roles at HATCH, a global engineering consultancy.

Of Sennik’s appointment, Agrawal said in a news release: “The Creative Destruction Lab is expanding rapidly, both geographically and programmatically. Sonia will provide leadership, vision, and energy to help ensure the success of the Lab and its ventures in the coming years.”

Graduates of CDL

Over the years, the Creative Destructive Lab has had many graduates, including:

  • Thalmic Labs (Waterloo): Thalmic Labs develops revolutionary wearable technologies that explore the future of human-computer interaction.
  • Atomwise (San Francisco): Atomwise is a Deep Learning technology designed for novel small molecule discovery to help develop better medicines faster.
  • Deep Genomics (Toronto): Deep Genomics creates life-saving genetic therapies including a biologically accurate data- and AI-driven platform that supports geneticists, molecular biologists, and chemists.
  • Kyndi (Palo Alto): Kyndi incorporates advanced artificial intelligence and symbolic natural language understanding to help knowledge workers process and consume vast amounts of information in order to better make critical decisions.
  • Heuritech (Paris): Heuritech bridges the gap between social media and commerce with cutting-edge deep learning technology that detects emerging product buzzes online.

To learn more about the Creative Destructive Lab, including information about applying, visit the main CDL website.

This article has been edited and republished with permissions from Clear Admit.


Sep 12, 2017

NYU Stern Hosts Economic Outlook Forum

NYU Stern Hosts Economic Outlook Forum

New York University’s Stern School of Business hosted the invitation-only Economic Outlook Forum last week, which featured an array of established financial experts from prominent business institutions.

The forum was titled, “The Economic and Market Outlook.” NYU Stern Director of the Center for Global Economy and Business Kim Schoenholtz moderated the discussion, which featured three panelists, including: Citigroup’s Willem Buiter, Deutsche Bank’s Peter Hooper, and Berenberg’s Mickey Levy.

Buiter is the Global Chief Economist at Citigroup, where he has worked since 2010. Formerly in London and now based in New York City, Buiter also teaches at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University.

Hooper is the Managing Director and Chief Economist for Deutsche Bank Securities, where he has worked since 1999. Before that, Hooper spent 26 years with the Federal Reserve Board in Washington DC.

Levy has spent over 30 years researching economic and public policy. Prior to Berenberg, Levy worked at Bank of America. Similar to Hooper, Levy has ties with Federal Reserve Banks.

Schoenholtz, who has worked at NYU Stern since 2009 after a stint with Citigroup, proved to be the perfect moderator. He’s an expert on money, banking, and macroeconomics with an immense global experience, having worked in New York City, London, and Tokyo. His influence continues as he sits on the Financial Research Committee of the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Research, as well as U.S. Monetary Policy Forum.

Different universities have hosted their own Economic Outlook Forums, including the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and Towson University.


Sep 11, 2017

Which 1-Year MBA Program in New York Is Right for You?

Which 1-Year MBA Program in New York Is Right for You?

New Yorkers are always in a hurry. For those looking for that same speed with their MBA, they’re in luck. The city—home to eight million people—has five schools where candidates can graduate with an MBA or similar degree within a year.

What better place to build your business knowledge than New York City? Business people from around the world come to the city—but not you. You’d be living in it. Plus, major international companies are headquartered there. JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, and IBM, for example.

Check out some of the best one-year MBA programs in the city that never sleeps.

Binghamton University School of Management

Binghamton University’s School of Management sits in Midtown New York City. Students will have easy access to Bryant Park, Penn Station, Grand Central Station, Port Authority, all the shopping they need—and the nearby beauty of Chelsea.

The school came to the area in 1970. Its Professional MBA is what sets Binghamton apart. It takes no more than a year, and students meet only on Saturdays. The curriculum does demand a full Saturday, but at least it wraps up in a year. And since it’s on the weekend, full-time working professionals are good to go, too. The school reports students can save $20,000-$50,000 compared to other MBA programs in New York City.

Zicklin School of Business – Baruch College

Baruch College formally created its Zicklin School of Business in 1998 after an endowment from an alumnus Lawrence Zicklin. But the MBA program has been offered since 1920.

Its one-year MBA program is fairly new. The first cohort enrolled this past summer. The program begins in June and takes 12 months. Applicants are expected to have two to five years experience. Given the program’s speed, the class schedule will be intense and build on already acquired knowledge. Students have the option to study abroad during the winter intersession.

Lubin School of Business – Pace University

The Lubin School of Business at Pace University has been around for more than 100 years. Since 1906, the school has been cranking out business graduates ready to take New York City by storm. It offers a unique one-year fast-track MBA—only in financial management.

This specialty in finance gives business students an edge. Graduates will walk away from Lubin knowing how to provide financial consultation to corporations. Lubin is sure to plug its students into any necessary resources for them to succeed. For example, MBA candidates can access the Bloomberg workstation and other financial databases. Classes are based in New York City and Westchester, a short train ride away.

Stern School of Business – New York University

New York University is one of New York City’s most well-known university, so the Stern School of Business is too, naturally. In the middle of Greenwich Village, students can occupy themselves with endless activities when they’re not in class.

However, the Stern School of Business doesn’t quite offer one-year MBAs. Its specialized one-year programs are for its MS in accounting, MS in business analytics, and an MS in global finance. These programs add an oomph to any business professional looking to build their expertise. Most of the programs include a global format, preparing graduates for a global field.

Lehigh University College of Business and Economics

Editor’s Note: As part of the Lehigh 1-MBA program enhancements, the internship component was replaced with a Consulting Practicum. Click here to learn more about the 1-MBA.

 


Sep 11, 2017

Full-Time MBA Battle: New York vs. Philly

Full-Time MBA Battle: New York vs. Philly

Whether it’s Giants vs. Eagles or the Statue of Liberty and the Liberty Bell, New York City and Philadelphia are two cities famous for being at odds with one another. Continue reading…


Sep 5, 2017

The New Faculty Joining NYU Stern This Fall

The New Faculty Joining NYU Stern This Fall

Seven new faculty members are joining New York University’s Stern School of Business this coming school year, according to a new press release from the school.

The 2017-18 academic school year will have two new tenure-track professors, two clinical professors, and three visiting professors. The tenure track professors include Joshua Loftus, Assistant Professor of Information, Operations, and Management Sciences, and Walker Hanlon, Assistant Professor of Economics. Clinical Associate Professor of Finance Kathleen DeRose and Clinical Professor of Marketing Paul Hardart join alongside the tenure track professors.

As for visiting professors, they are:

  • Bryan Hong – Visiting Assistant Professor of Management
  • Pricila Maziero – Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics
  • Ning Su – Visiting Associate Professor of Information, Operations and Management Sciences

DeRose, a financial technology expert, isn’t exactly new to the school, however, having been an adjunct since last year. Hong is interested in a business’ social responsibility. He’s currently studying how firms can deal with future disruptions. Hanlon will add an interesting variety to the school’s economics lessons. He studies the economy from a historical perspective. He’s currently looking at pollution, too, and its impacts on employment. Hanlon previously taught at Princeton University.

The business school already features a robust roster of faculty. These seven will only add to the school’s respected professors like Jennifer Carpenter and Nouriel Roubini.


Aug 30, 2017

Part-Time MBA Programs: New York City vs. Boston

Part-Time MBA Programs: New York City vs. Boston

Part-time MBAs offer an abundance of perks: more flexibility, online courses, and even weekend and evening classes. They open the door for professionals who want an MBA but might also have children or a full-time job or other responsibilities that take priority.

If looking at the East Coast, two cities may come to mind: New York City and Boston. Both are drastically different metros just by the size alone. New York City is home to more than eight million people. Boston is nearly 675,000. That’s a big difference.

But both places have plenty to offer. It just comes down to what a person is looking for.

Here is the quick version for both cities:

  • New York City: The city’s part-time programs cater to candidates interested in pragmatic skills like math or finance. They’re also very flexible. Being that it’s New York City, students tend to be more diverse, coming from different countries and backgrounds.
  • Boston: Schools definitely offer advantages for candidates who already hold a professional certification like a CPA or CFA. Classes are dramatically smaller than those in New York. Surprisingly, some tuition is more costly than in New York City, but living in Boston is more affordable. Programs also seem to focus on international skills.

New York City

New York City is one of the greatest cities in the world. This is true when it comes to culture, business, networking, and all of the above. People from all around the world frequent this city. The city has its quirks, of course. The public transit system is in a state of emergency. During the summer, it’s not uncommon to find putrid smells sneaking into your nostrils. And there are, of course, the pests and rodents.

But all of this is worth it to the many transplants who move to New York City. After all, the city does hold the title of the world’s second largest metropolitan economy, following Tokyo—a city with a significantly larger population. More than three million of the city’s residents are foreign-born, which is a perk for someone who wants to break into the international sector. New York City really is a magnificent place if you’re looking for vibrancy and a taste of the world beyond the U.S. may look like. It’s a global city.

These schools offer part-time MBAs around New York City:

  • Lubin School of Business – Pace University
  • Rutgers Business School, Newark and New Brunswick (New Jersey)
  • Stern School of Business – New York University
  • Tobin College of Business – St. John’s University
  • Zicklin School of Business – Baruch College

Every school offers its unique set of courses and perks. St. John’s University’s Tobin College of Business has classes during the evenings and weekends. Its curriculum is straightforward: Take 54 credits with a maximum of 36 going toward your concentration.

For NYU Stern, there’s a bit more flexibility. Students can take up to six years completing their MBA if they need. If just the weekends are ideal, candidates are limited to two concentrations: finance and management. The campus is diverse with 34 percent of students female and 24 percent people of color.

The Lubin School of Business offers classes at all times of the day and week. The school offers concentrations in international business and international finance, a benefit to any student wanting to take their work global. It requires that three credits outside a student’s concentration be in international business, so the program definitely leans toward teaching competitive skills for an international market.

The Rutgers Business School is a little far out with its campuses in New Jersey. However, that’s a short ride from New York City (and the cost of living is cheaper in New Jersey, too). The school’s part-time program doesn’t stray too far from its full-time one. It includes an interactive course requirement and makes sure that its students walk away with a working knowledge of statistics and calculus. Math will come in handy when handling business.

The Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College allows students interested to pursue their JD/MBA in partnership with Brooklyn Law School or New York Law School. Accountancy majors can also obtain a CPA with their MBA.

Boston

Boston is like a little piece of Europe in New England. Perhaps that’s why Boston sits at the heart of the region. Its cobblestone sidewalks and streets are an ever-present reminder of the region’s history. While it is certainly not as bustling as New York City, it doesn’t mean it’s quiet. Boston is always booming with tourists on the hunt for the perfect lobster roll or college students traversing their way to class. It’s also culturally diverse with most of its population non-white.

The city doesn’t see the musty summers that New York does, but it does see some severe winters. If snow’s your thing, that’s a perk. If it’s not, well, tough luck. The city does, however, rank among the highest concentrations of employment, so a graduate is sure to find a job in the area. Unlike New York, Boston has already invested in its public transit infrastructure to ensure that residents can get around easily.

Then again, that means parking and driving in the city sucks. You can’t have it all.

These schools offer part-time MBAs around Boston:

  • Carroll School of Management – Boston College
  • D’Amore-McKim School of Business – Northeastern University
  • Sawyer Business School – Suffolk University

At Northeastern University, flexibility is a strong suit. The program starts in September and January of each year, but students can take as long as they need to complete the program. The D’Amore-McKim School of Business gives students the option to take part in an international field study, which last one to two weeks.

The Carroll School of Management at Boston College gives online and hybrid courses. The school is big on experiential learning, so it does a great job of exposing students to real-world professionals. If a student already holds a CFA or CPA, they are eligible for advanced standing. Like many other Boston schools, the Carroll School is big on expanding students’ experiences beyond Boston. They take TechTreks to nearby New York City or even Seattle. But that doesn’t exempt students from the mandatory 20 hours of community service.

The Sawyer Business School offers a part-time MBA that can be completed in 10 months. That’s shorter than some full-time MBA programs. There’s a summer option, too, for anyone who’s in a rush to graduate. From the beginning, candidates must plan for their career with their first semester including a one-credit business simulation course. The program also has a three-credit global requirement. Students have gone on to China and Brazil in the past for a week-long global travel seminar.


Aug 14, 2017

Top 5 Schools for an MBA in Real Estate

Top 5 Schools for an MBA in Real Estate

The number of MBA students who pursue careers in real estate may be small, but even still, some of the most prestigious business schools in the United States offer exceptional programs that specialize in the field. Continue reading…


Jun 8, 2017

RECAP: US News —10 MBA Programs With the Highest Signing Bonuses

RECAP: US News —10 MBA Programs With the Highest Signing Bonuses

Each year, prospective MBAs and college administrators eagerly await for U.S. News & World Report’s annual MBA rankings. The list has become one of the top MBA rankings in the country, and is calculated by self-reported data from 471 business schools regarding its academic programs and the makeup of its student body, among other areas. Continue reading…